Free Slide Presentation Provides Details About the National Directory of Physician Organizations Database

A free slide presentation with details about the National Directory of Physician Organizations Database is available.

Interest in physician organizations has grown in recent years due to a number of factors and they have taken on new importance and energy.

The physician organization database includes details and contact information on independent practice associations (IPAs), physician hospital organizations (PHOs) large multi-specialty medical groups, primary care networks and practice management services organizations.

The database is researched and produced the Managed care Information Center (MCIC.)

To receive your free, no obligation copy of the National Directory of Physician Organizations Database slide presentation please click on this link now: National Directory of Physician Organizations Database Free Slide Presentation

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Physician Organizations – IPAs – PHOs Can Improve Care Management For Smaller Practices, New Study Finds

On average, physician practices participating in independent practice associations (IPAs) and physician hospital organizations (PHOs) provided nearly three times as many care management processes for patients with chronic conditions as nonparticipating practices did, the results of a new study found.

The difference is dramatic – 10.45 percent versus 3.85 percent, found the researchers. And, half of these processes were provided only by IPAs or PHOs.

All the recent initiatives surrounding physician practice including pay-for-performance, public reporting, and accountable care organization programs places pressure on physicians to use health information technology and organized care management processes to improve the care they provide.

The problem is physician practices that are not large may lack the resources and size to implement such processes.

The researchers said they used data from a “unique national survey of 1,164 practices with fewer than twenty physicians to provide the first information available on the extent to which IPAs and PHOs might make it possible for these smaller practices to share resources to improve care.”

Nearly a quarter of the practices participated in an IPA or a PHO that accounted for a significant proportion of their patients, the study found.

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IPA-PHO Database – The National Directory of Physician Organizations profiles more than 1,300 physician organizations. Listings include: physician hospital organizations (PHOs), independent practice associations (IPAs), multi-specialty medical groups, physician primary care networks, and management service organizations (MSOs) The National Directory of Physician Organizations

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These organizations may provide a way for small and medium-size practices to systematically improve care and participate in accountable care organizations, said the researchers.

“The data presented suggest that IPAs and PHOs may be able to provide an additional, potentially viable organizational alternative during an era of major changes in how health care is delivered and paid for,” the study authors wrote.

The research team was led by Lawrence P. Casalino, MD. The study results appeared in the August Issue of Health Affairs.

Physician Turnover Increases; Competition, Pace of Turnover and Retirements Expected to Increasee

Medical groups reported an average turnover rate of 6.8 percent in 2012, according to the 8th annual Physician Retention Survey.

Likewise, there was turnover of 11.5 percent among advanced practice clinicians (APCs), which includes physician assistants and nurse practitioners, found the survey by Cejka Search and the American Medical Group Association (AMGA). Continue reading

Accountable Care Organizations Getting More Scrutiny

A number of independent practice associations (IPAs) and other physician organizations – PHOs, multi-specialty medical groups and hospitals have created new accountable care organizations.

Because we produce the National Directory of Physician Organizations, we naturally are following ACO developments.

ACOs are very much top-of-mind as ACO numbers grow. And with that awareness comes increased attention. Continue reading

Physician Organization Leadership Frustrated With Shrinking and Changing Payer Reimbursement, Increasing Administrative Work Load

“Reimbursement that does not even cover costs”

Shortages of primary care physicians: fewer primary care physicians in the face of more patients means those in practice will have to shoulder more responsibilities, is a key challenge cited by a vice president of a physician practice management company.

Along with that issue physicians “juggling increased administrative burdens with maintaining patient quality of care,” the VP observed.

The concerns of executives and administrators of physician organizations emerge from the results of the Continue reading

A Glance Back: Boom Times For Growth of New IPAs Began to Slow Dramatically in 1999

Despite today’s somewhat ‘rosy’ outlook for physician organizations, the IPA equivalent of the Dot Com bust occurred in 2002 when only two new IPAs were formed, found Managed Care Information Center Research.

The peak year for IPA growth was 1994 when 174 new physician organizations formed, according to data for the National Directory of Physician Organizations Database. The year 1995 was close with 138 new IPAs formed, our analysts found.
Source: The National Directory of Physician Organizations Database. http://healthresourcesonline.healthrespubs.com/managed_care/23poe.htm

Will large numbers of physician organizations or physician groups develop an accountable care organization?

Will large numbers of physician organizations or physician groups develop an accountable care organization?

“No.  Although an important component to a successful ACO, physicians will not have the infrastructure needed to develop an ACO,” a Regional Network Manager with a health plan told us in our Managed Care Leadership Survey.

“Physicians want to own healthcare but they have no infrastructure or expertise on the risk side of healthcare,” a consultant said.

“The emphasis on integration, EMR, quality and payment require a solid infrastructure which is beyond the capacity of most physicians per se,” said another consultant.

Said another respondent: “Most do not have the infrastructure, resources or expertise necessary to lead the development.” Few have the motivation.”

“We need provider buy-in and that doesn’t happen quickly,” according to a health plan manager of strategic growth.

Only a small number of physician organizations/groups “have the capital to develop an ACO without getting into the pockets of insurance companies,” said another senior consultant.

The survey is conducted by the Managed Care Information Center, which produces the National Directory of Physician Organizations Database.

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